Welcome to St. Therese Parish


Wwelcome you to join with the Faith Community at St. Therese Parish as we gather together to celebrate the Eucharist, the Sacraments or a time of prayer. We welcome back members of St. Therese Parish who have been away for a summer time visit to family and friends in the North! Our special welcome is extended to all who are visiting from the area and also to those who are vacationing in southwest Florida. To those who will be traveling this week – travel safely.

Our parish is a vibrant, welcoming and prayerful parish.  Our parish has lived of and proclaimed the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the North Fort Myers area. Our diverse community is indeed a microcosm of the universal Church. Here we seek to live the Gospel through the active celebration of the Sacraments, lifelong faith formation, and a continuing commitment to our brother and sisters. We look forward to praying with you, praising Jesus Christ with you, celebrating with you, and spreading the good news of God’s love for all with you!

Make a commitment to pray with and to join in the spiritual journey of those who gather at St. Therese Church by taking time to register.  If you have recently moved into our area or have been here for a long time, but have not registered in the parish, please do.   Making oneself known also makes it possible for others to minister to us when the need arises.  Join with St. Therese Parish by returning a completed registration form (found at the main entrance of the church) or by coming to the parish office.

Respect Life Conference


The Diocese of Venice is hosting the Florida Respect Life Conference on Friday and Saturday, September 28 & 29 at the Charlotte Harbor Event and Conference Center in Punta Gorda, Florida.  Each of the seven dioceses in Florida takes a turn hosting this statewide conference so it is only once every seven years that we have the privilege of hosting it.

International, national and state speakers will inspire and empower you with their expertise and amazing personal stories on today’s critical issues, demonstrating how to “Love one another as I have loved you.”  Let’s learn and pray together as we build a Culture of Life.

You are invited to attend the 2018 Statewide Florida Respect Life Conference in beautiful Punta Gorda.  Information and registration are available online at https://dioceseofvenice.org/offices/offices-departments/respect-life/florida-respect-life-conference-2018/

Sponsored by:

The Florida Catholic Conference State Pro-life Coordinating Committee

Questions?
Contact Respect Life Office
Diocese of Venice
941-374-1068
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


School Supplies Collection

FORMED - The Catholic Faith On Demand


St. Therese’s has subscribed to a dynamic and exciting new online platform called FORMEDThis “Catholic version of Netflix,” FORMED, is the revolutionary digital platform that gives you unprecedented access to the best Catholic content there is - video-based study programs, feature films, audio presentations, and eBooks from the Church’s foremost presenters. Whether fallen away or deeply engaged, at the parish or on the go, FORMED will help you grow in your faith, find deeper peace with God, and share what you believe with others.  This wonderful program was donated to St. Therese Parish.  We are grateful for this generous donor for this wonderful gift to our Faith Family.

All parishioners have 24/7 FREE access to the best Catholic content on any device, including your computer, smartphone and tablet with internet access through this access code for St. Therese parishioners.


 

To get your free account started,

-      Go to the FORMED website at formed.org - and sign with our parish access code: BG6HWX.  Enter your email and create a password.

-      Click this link www.sainttheresechurch.formed.org - Enter your email and create a password.


This Catholic media library is a FREE gift to you as a St. Therese Parishioner and includes books, programs, DVDs, CD’s etc. that will help you dive deeper into your faith.

If you have any questions about FORMED or have trouble accessing your free account, please contact Nelson Perez at (239) 567-2315 ext. 203 or e-mail at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

 

Unlimited Use for Our Entire Parish

300+ episodes of video-based study programs

35+ feature films and movies

45+ audio presentations

25+ eBooks

Available in English and Spanish!

Available 24/7

 

STUDY PROGRAMS

300+ episodes of transformational video-based study programs including accompanying study guides essential for discipleship

AUDIO PROGRAMS

48 life-changing Lighthouse Talks™ for evangelization made easy

MOVIES

40 captivating full-length feature films bring families together

EBOOKS

Dozens of inspiring eBooks to enliven the faith of both individuals and groups

 

Compelling and Trustworthy Teachers

 

You can see what’s on FORMED by checking out the trailers below. 

What is FORMED.org?

https://vimeo.com/139714262

 

How can FORMED help my marriage?

By providing you with beautiful testimonies from other Catholic couples and the life-changing teachings of the Church through videos like Beloved that you and your spouse can watch together at home and then discuss and pray about together.  See the trailer below!

https://vimeo.com/153162904

 

How can FORMED help my kids?

By giving you awesome Catholic speakers who know how to talk to kids about the Faith right at your fingertips and on their mobile devices.  See the sample below!

https://vimeo.com/139714995

 

How can FORMED help me get closer to God?

By showing you through formation series like Lectio how to pray so that your prayer time is a genuine encounter with God that you experience personally.  Check out the trailer below!

https://vimeo.com/153162929

 

How can FORMED help me invite my loved ones back to the Church?

By sharing videos like this with them that they can watch right on their smart phones.  They’ll hear things about the faith they never knew before or “never heard explained this way.” Check out the compelling trailer below!

https://vimeo.com/153516243

 

Testimonies

“FORMED provides Catholics of all ages access to excellent Catholic resources. In a parish, school, or home setting, utilizing the best in current technology, FORMED becomes a powerful evangelization tool for the modern world.”

Bishop Gerard Bergie, D.D.  |  Ontario

“God be praised for FORMED. . . . Folks who hadn’t been to Confession in years were moved to return to the sacrament . . . one person returned after 40 years!”

Fr. Joseph Cooper  |  New Hampshire

“FORMED has been an invaluable resource in my journey . . . and it has helped bring me closer to our Lord Jesus Christ and our Blessed Mother. What else could anyone ask for?”

Christian  |  Colorado

 

Ordinary Time: Growing in Faith Throughout the Year

Ordinary Time is the season of the Church year when Catholics are encouraged to grow and mature in daily expression of their faith outside the great seasons of celebration of Christmas and Easter and the great periods of penance of Advent and Lent.

Ordinary Time is a time to deepen one's prayer life, read the Scriptures, unite more deeply with the Lord in the Eucharist and become a more holy and whole person.

Ordinary Time is a period when average people like you and me strive to become the extraordinary messengers of the Gospel that we have been commissioned to be through our Baptism.

Ordinary Time is this day, this moment.  Now.

What is "Ordinary Time"?

The season of Ordinary Time begins on Monday (or Tuesday if the feast of the Baptism of the Lord is celebrated on that Monday) after the Sunday following Jan. 6 and continues until the day before Ash Wednesday, inclusive. It begins again on the Monday after Pentecost and ends on the Saturday before the first Sunday of Advent. It consists of 33 or 34 weeks. The last Sunday is celebrated as the Solemnity of Christ the King. The overall purpose of the season is to elaborate the themes of salvation history.

The various liturgical seasons are characterized in part by the scriptural readings and Mass prayers assigned to each of them. During Advent, for example, the readings are messianic; during the Easter season, from the Acts of the Apostles, chronicling the Resurrection and the original proclamation of Christ by the Apostles, and from the Gospel of John; during Lent, baptismal and penitential passages. Mass prayers reflect the meaning and purpose of the various seasons.


Six exceptional ways to live the Church's "Ordinary Time"

By Woodeene Koenig-Bricker

Until Advent or Lent begins, we're in a liturgical transition phase. How to make the most of it.

Advent has its wreath, its candles, its hymns -- all of which culminate in Christmas. Lent has ashes, fasting, Stations of the Cross -- and the Resurrection. It's easy to be energized and excited about the faith during the High Holy Days. But Ordinary Time? It's just so, well, ordinary.

How do you stay involved and engaged when Sundays seem to run together and the next liturgical high point is weeks or months away?

There are, of course, the standard suggestions: attend daily Mass, say the Rosary, make more frequent confessions. They are good ideas and can certainly help with a lagging faith, but many of us either already do these things or have done so in the past. What we long for is an infusion of ideas that are both a little different and yet still deeply rooted in our traditions.

So here are six suggestions to help make Ordinary Time a little less ordinary.

1. Create your own novena

A novena, nine days of private or public prayer intended to obtain a special grace, favor or blessing has long been a part of the Church's devotions. You can find novenas for everything from world peace to healing, most of which are directed to end on a particular feast day of Mary, Jesus or a prominent saint. But you can create your own novena, choosing your own ending day and devotional activity. For instance, create a birthday novena. Do something special for the nine days before your birthday or the birthday of someone you love; you can certainly say a prayer like the Hail Mary or Our Father, but you might also light a candle, read a poem, work on a piece of art or plant a flower. Whatever you do, place yourself in the presence of God and offer your activity with your whole heart, mind and soul.

2. Keep a gratitude journal

Some scientific studies have shown that people who regularly "count their blessings" are happier than those who don't. Often we are so focused on the negatives in our lives we overlook the positives. So, during Ordinary Time, take a small notebook and, once a day, write at least five things you are thankful for. They don't have to be earth-shattering; "a cup of coffee" will suffice. Then, on Sunday, read aloud your list, saying before each item: "God, I thank you for..." It seems like a simple activity, but it can literally be life-changing as a concrete, permanent record of the blessings of your life that is hard to overlook even when you are feeling down.

3. Focus on God's abundance

Last year a person decided that since so many things seemed to be going wrong in her life, she would concentrate on the ways God showed his providence in a tangible, practical manner. Every day she e-mailed a friend to relate what "abundance" God had provided. Sometimes it was a small thing -- like finding a quarter on the sidewalk. Other times it was larger -- like being given a washing machine when hers broke. At times it was nonmaterial, like having a neighbor blow the leaves from her yard. But as the days went by, it became obvious that God was continually showering abundance on her. It became a daily joy to see what new gift God had for her that day.

4. Act out

One of the reasons our faith can become stale is because it becomes too cerebral. Instead of "doing," we spend most of our time "thinking." So put your faith in action. No, that doesn't mean you have to start vigils at abortion centers or volunteering at soup kitchens -- although those things are good and may be just what some people need. You can act out your faith in smaller, more homey ways as well. For instance, Jesus told us if we had two coats, we should share with those who had none. Most of us probably have at least two coats in our closets, so paring down our clothes could be a great place to begin. During Ordinary Time, simplifying, eliminating and giving away those things that we no longer use can become a great act of faith... and a great faith-builder.

5. Read something with moral value

Have you ever read "The Confessions," by St. Augustine? "Introduction to the Devout Life," by St. Francis de Sales? "The Brothers Karamazov," by Fyodor Dostoevsky? Or for more modern tastes "Mr. Blue," by Myles Connolly, "In This House of Brede," by Rumer Goden or even the current best-seller "The Shack," by William P. Young? In the weeks when the Church is not preparing for something special, we have the time to read what others have written about God, faith and the meaning of life. We don't have to agree with everything we read, but reading morally engaging literature is one of the best ways to keep our faith vital and vibrant.

6. Keep the Sabbath

The weeks of Ordinary Time are ideally suited to creating family rituals that keep the Sabbath as a special day. Without the pressure of holidays and holy days, we can design our own personal practices that make Sunday a day to anticipate. As with most things, these don't have to be elaborate. Perhaps stopping at the doughnut shop on the way home from Mass and letting everyone pick their favorite could become a "tradition." Or reinstitute a sit-down family dinner Sunday evening, even if you are sitting down to eat take-out. Or read aloud or listen to a book on tape. Just find something you and your family can enjoy and save that activity for the Sabbath.

Ordinary Time is only ordinary if we think of it that way. If we consider these weeks, not as the long boring stretches between the good stuff, but as a time to try new things and refocus our energies on our spiritual growth, Ordinary Time can become one of our favorite -- and most rewarding -- times of year

There's Always Something to Celebrate

Even though Ordinary Time doesn't build to a single great feast like Advent or Lent, it's not without its high points. Trinity Sunday (June 7), Corpus Christi (June 11 or 14), the Assumption of Mary (Aug. 15), All Saints (Nov. 1) and Christ the King (Nov. 22) are just a few of the important celebrations that fall during these weeks.

No First Sunday of Ordinary Time?

If you go to Mass on the feast of the Baptism of the Lord, which is celebrated on the Sunday after Epiphany, you may be startled to see the next Sunday is "The Second Sunday of Ordinary Time." What happened to the First Sunday? It's a little confusing. The Sunday Masses for the Baptism of the Lord are the very last celebrations of the Christmas season. However, Evening Prayer that night is the first liturgical marker for Ordinary Time. Therefore, the first part of that Sunday is Christmas and the second part is Ordinary Time. The next day, Monday, is the "First Monday of Ordinary Time." Therefore, the next Sunday has to be "The Second Sunday in Ordinary Time," because it is the Sunday of the second week in Ordinary Time.

It Wasn't Always Ordinary

The early Church didn't seem to have any special terms for the non-Advent and non-Easter seasons, even though they were clearly recognized. During much of the Church's history, the two blocks of time were called the "Season after Epiphany" and the "Season after Pentecost." It wasn't until the new Catholic calendar took effect in 1969 after the Second Vatican Council that the term "Ordinary Time" came into common use in the liturgical calendar.

The Cardinal Difference

It's tempting to think that Ordinary Time got its name because it is "ordinary" or non-exceptional, but that's not really the case. Ordinary Time means ordered or numbered time and is derived from "ordinal numbers" (first, second, third, etc.) as opposed to "cardinal numbers" (one, two, three). It begins on the Monday after the Baptism of Our Lord and is counted sequentially until Lent. The count then resumes where it left off on the Monday after Pentecost and continues until Advent.

Because the beginning of Lent is a movable feast, Ordinary Time can last 33 or 34 weeks.


Thank You to the Knights of Columbus All Saints Council 8440


THANK YOU to the members of the Knights of Columbus who worked together in the preparation and serving of the monthly dinners during this past season.  Your gift of time and effort means so much to all of us at St. Therese Faith Family.  You are all to be commended for being so generous, thoughtful, and gracious to our parish family.  Everything was beautiful, delicious and fun.  We are truly grateful for the generosity and caring the Council has always shown to our parish community.  We know it took a lot of planning and work, and we are sincerely grateful.  God's blessings to All Saints Council 8440.  May you be blessed a hundredfold!

 

A very special THANK YOU to all who attended the Parish monthly dinners sponsored and hosted by the Knights of Columbus.  The dinners will resume in the fall of 2018.  All profits from the dinners are given to the Catholic Faith Appeal.  Again, THANK YOU to all participants and to the Knights!!

 


Faith, Hope & Love 50/50 Raffle Winners

 

Raffle Winners ~ August 2018

Ticket # 870383

Ticket # 875395

Ticket # 875442

Winning Tickets must be claimed no later than September 28, 2018.

Thank you to all who participated.